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A Laundry Room with a Sense of Humor

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London’s Laundromat – 24 Hours, Not Quite Self Service

When a busy mom of four hired me to organize her townhouse, the laundry room was one of her top priorities. Although it wasn’t the sexiest room in the house, it was a space used multiple times a day.

The laundry room was small but well designed with a sense of humor. A counter ran the length of one wall with IKEA shelves above and the washer and dryer below the counter. The opposite wall boasted a sink and linen closet tucked behind the door. A clothesline that retracted into the wall was used to hang hand washed clothing. The sign painted on the wall read, “London’s Laundromat, 24 Hours, Self-Service.

When I arrived, the counter was completely covered with clothing. Boxes of cleaning supplies and random items such as swim goggles and game pieces littered the space as well. The linen closet was stuffed with sheets, towels, backpacks, and tote bags.

I started by tackling the linen closet because I correctly assumed there would be lots of easy to purge items. For example, crib sheets were comingled with other sheets even though the youngest child hadn’t slept in a crib in at least two years. New sheets had been purchased for all of the beds, yet the old sheets still remained. These were all eliminated as well as those that were mismatched, torn, or stained. Tip: when you buy something new remember to eliminate what you bought it to replace. In order to increase the linear feet of space in the linen closet, I added two extra shelves. Moving forward, bed linens would be stored in the bedroom in which they were used. The linen closet would only accommodate guest sheets, towels, and extra laundry supplies.

Clearing off the counter was simple. Laundry was folded and put away in each child’s bedroom. A cumbersome drying rack was discarded. Random items were put where they belonged or discarded. Glass anchor canisters were used to decant laundry detergent and fabric softener.

Since the cabinets which were from IKEA, I used 10 IKEA white curved bins which perfectly fit the space. Like items were grouped together such as sewing supplies, glass cleaners, floor cleaners, sunblock and insect repellent, batteries, and rags. These were labeled using the @Ptouchessentials label maker.  The top shelves which were largely inaccessible were used to store overstock and items rarely used.

Once the space was purged, the counters cleared, and items were sorted, contained, and labeled, the space was so appealing that this client said she almost didn’t mind doing laundry. Almost.

 

Living Room Facelift

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One day, as I sat in my living room answering emails, I realized that I couldn’t stand my rug. Over the course of that afternoon, I became obsessed with replacing it. Immediately. So, I raced to the D&D building in NYC, selected three potential rugs, and brought samples home to review in the space. While none of them seemed right, and all of them cost more than I wanted to spend, I’m a sucker for crossing things off my list. So I called my dear friend, Allison Peyton, for help making the decision. Allison, who has phenomenal taste and is trained as a designer, has strong opinions that she finds difficult not to express.  In other words, the exact reason we’re such close friends.  When I texted photos of the rugs I was considering, she let me know she “hated all of them,” and I would need to clear my calendar in 3 weeks to spend the day with her.

On the appointed day, I took an early train to meet Allison in Connecticut. Our first stop was the Elizabeth Eakin sample sale in Norwalk. When the doors opened, we burst inside, and 45 minutes later I had purchased two rugs that cost a fraction of what I was going to pay for just one rug a few weeks earlier. Feeling excited about my new purchases and the money I had saved, I asked if she thought I needed anything else. Continue reading “Living Room Facelift” »

Young Matriarch

A Young Matriarch

· Family, Makeovers · , , , , , ,

Our featured client this month is Samantha, the mother of three young children and the matriarch of a large extended family. This hostess extraordinaire often cooks for 30 family members and friends to celebrate Shabbat each weekend. In addition, Samantha maintains toys for every possible age group to ensure that even the youngest guest has appropriate entertainment. Over time, though, her home has become the self declared “weigh station” for toys, clothing, books, cookware, and furniture for relatives and friends with younger children, ones who have yet to have children, and even those who are not yet married.

Like many women who hire us, Samantha’s organizational skills are the envy of her friends (“why do you need an organizer,” is a popular refrain she hears). Yet, Samantha felt that she needed expert advise in how to streamline her life to entertain and function at a higher level. She knew it was time to take back her home – it could no longer be a proverbial ‘candy store’ for children and adults alike – and she needed our help.

Continue reading “A Young Matriarch” »

The Power of Paint, by Guest Blogger Paul Denikin

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I recently became acquainted with Paul Denikin. While Paul was always interested in home improvement, he became an expert when his daughter, Maggie, was born with special needs. At that time, Paul realized  he needed to modify his home so that it would be safe and functional for Maggie.  He started his website, dadknowsdiy.com, to share what he’s learned with the rest of us.   Here, he talks about how painting your home can improve its value and its appearance.

DIY home improvements are one of the most common ways home sellers will try to increase the value of their home. While some DIY projects can be complex or expensive such as redoing your bathroom, other projects are far less complicated. It may seem difficult to up the value of your home, but in reality, a few simple improvements can dramatically change how your house is viewed by potential buyers. The best way to make an impact without breaking the bank? Paint.

Continue reading “The Power of Paint, by Guest Blogger Paul Denikin” »